Agile Musings

I’ve been writing my own code using Test Driven Development (TDD) for about 6 months now, and at the same time have found myself professionally working for two different non-games firms.  In this time I’ve had the opportunity to try using agile methodologies – and unit testing – in a few different environments: business through to casual.  I want to share some thoughts and musings from this time.

Firstly, tests are hard.  Plenty of people have covered this point in the blogosphere and beyond, but until I actually tried it just never truly sunk in how hard they are.  It’s one thing to be “informed” that “agile is difficult”, but it’s an altogether different experience when I’m staring blankly at my screen with absolutely no idea how to write a test for this functionality I want.  And those moments happen.  A lot.  And they are truly a struggle to get through, but I learn very important lessons once I figure them out.  And yes, it takes dedication and effort to figure them out.

Secondly, getting tests onto legacy code is even harder.  I have a secret obsession with Michael Feathers’ fantastic book Working With Legacy Code, which gives some plentiful ideas for how to add tests to code that was never designed with tests in mind.  Armed with these suggestions, some experience writing brand new code covered by tests, and the right environment, one can get tests on just about anything.  In a casual environment i.e. When I’m my own boss, I find it pretty easy to see the benefit for refactoring old code to make it testable (I’m easily convinced though) :).  Things get a bit iffy when the work is for someone else though.  In my experience there are often factors preventing the system going under test that have absolutely nothing to do with the code.  People can be lazy, or busy, or scared of tests.  Unless the whole team makes a commitment to getting agile, it’s probably not a good idea to spend hours finding seams and getting code under tests.

Finally, it’s worth it.  It’s damn worth it.  I’ve never written such beautiful or simple code as I do when I write tests first.  But code aesthetics is a nothing phrase to most managers and business men.  Luckily, along with writing nice code I find I write code that catches bugs more easily (at this stage each bug is usually a situation where I didn’t think to put a test case in), code that’s easier to maintain and understand (easy to tell what something does and how it works when a test is written for it) and my favourite: it increases my productivity (I make it a point to end each of my coding sessions on a failing test.  It’s lovely to just hit compile and see exactly what that next thing I need to do is.  Straight back into it!)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *